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Amorgos

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amorgos-chozoviotissa.jpg

A secluded destination

Amorgos is the seventh-largest island of the Cyclades in the heart of the Aegean sea and the nearest to the Dodecanese island group in Greece. It is one of the Cyclades' secret gems, with a mind-blowing natural landscape, modest Cycladic architecture, fascinating caves, and pristine beaches. It is a greek island untouched by mass tourism and the ideal holiday spot for people seeking solitude and tranquillity, as well as a great option for nature enthusiasts! Despite being one of the relatively unknown islands, it became popular due to the filming of Luc Besson's "The Big Blue" on the island, starring Jean Reno.

 

The island of Amorgos has a strong cultural history and tradition, having been inhabited from the Early Cycladic Era, as evidenced by archaeological artifacts discovered in the vicinity. Off the usual path, explore an island that has retained its traditional color, where the residents greet you with a grin and make you feel at home. 

Visit Amorgos town (Chora)

Amorgos' villages are known for their scenic stone-paved alleys and craggy windmills, as well as for spectacular views of the Aegean Sea. The maze-like Chora of Amorgos, built in the heart of the island and surrounded by rocky hills, is regarded as one of the most idyllic in the Cyclades! Strolling around Chora, you'll come across a gorgeous setting with beautiful squares, typical Cycladic villas with bougainvillea plants in their courtyards, and small whitewashed alleys.

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Discover the sheer beauty of the unspoiled beaches

Amorgos is one of the most unspoiled Cycladic islands, with amazing beaches with blue waters, beautiful caves, great diving places, scenic bays, and old footpaths winding over its rugged rocky landscape. There are plenty of beaches to choose from, including beautiful sandy beaches, quiet and deserted coves, or pebble beaches.  

Agia Anna beach is the most popular beach on the island, courtesy to the film "grand bleu", which filmed some of its scenes here. It offers a wonderful diving and snorkeling experience in the pristine waters of the Aegean Sea. The monastery of Panagia Hozoviotissa, Amorgos' most notable site, is only a few feet away from Agia Anna Beach.  

Mouros Beach is distinguished by blue waters and a rocky landscape. It is accessible through a hiking trail, and there is a tiny café with a spectacular view nearby. Agios Pavlos, Aegiali, Maltezi, Levrossos also stand out due to their pristine sand formation and calm clear waters. Kalotaritissa is a golden beach unlike any other on the island, making it ideal for unwinding. Boat cruises from Kalotaritissa to the uninhabited island of Krambousa are available throughout the summer. 

Attractions & activities

Panagia Hozoviotissa (Virgin Mary), a breathtaking monastery built on a rocky cliff above the sea, is the most captivating sight on the island. This cliffside monastery from the 10th century features beautiful traditional architecture and stunning views of the sea. 

If you love to scuba dive, Nikouria (just outside Agios Pavlos beach), has an underwater cave filled with colorful sponges and fishes, making it an interesting diving destination. Another dive tour is to the cargo ship Marina 3, which sank in 1981 at the tiny island of Skinopi, just a few minutes by boat from Amorgos.

 

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The seabed of Amorgos has old shipwrecks and natural reefs. If you love to scuba dive, Nikouria (just outside Agios Pavlos beach) has an underwater cave filled with colorful sponges and fishes, making it an interesting diving destination. Another dive tour is to the cargo ship Marina 3, which sank in 1981 at the tiny island of Skinopi, just a few minutes by boat from Amorgos.

The hiking routes that cross the island are ideal for discovering the island's natural beauty, and the quiet beaches are ideal for naturists. There are various well-marked trails on the island that lead to isolated beaches, wrecked windmills and cultural artifacts. They cross the island from one side to the other, allowing you to see the sights and vestiges of historic settlements that overlook the Aegean. Every walk on the island is a unique experience, especially during the spring, when the place is inundated with the fragrances of the herbs.

Amorgos' gastronomic scene

During your visit, you must definitely taste some of the delicious local delights and sip a shot or two of the famous rakomelo (a powerful alcoholic drink laced with honey). Some local meals and delicacies to try include patatato goat (meat and potato stew), xidato (offal soup), pasteli (honey-sesame bar), baked raki (sweetened alcoholic drink with spices) and xerotigana (deep fried flatbread with honey and nuts). Amorgos is the only place where baked raki (psimeni raki) is produced. It is frequently served as a treat in celebrations as an appetizer or as a digestive.

How to get to Amorgos

Amorgos' two ports, Katapola and Aigiali, are accessible by ferry from Athens (port of Piraeus). There are also numerous ferry services from other Cycladic islands. Amorgos has no airport, however you can fly to Naxos or Santorini and then take a ferry to Amorgos. Amorgos island is a great choice for island hopping in Greece. Amorgos has frequent sailings to neighboring Cycladic and Dodecanese islands. 

Amorgos Retreats 2024

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September 9 - 14 | Elle Daniel
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